Tag Archives: Nepal

Nepal’s Labour Act 2074 (2017 AD): I’m not comparing, however, can’t help but notice poor implementation

Nepal’s Labour Act 2074 (2017 AD) also provides workers’ rights somewhere close to those principles. I’m not comparing, however, can’t help but notice poor implementation of the same. Heads-up! concerned authority, regulatory body, enforcement agency, administrative offices, responsible personnel, to say the least; what/where are your findings, inspection, monitoring, records, performance evaluation, corrective actions, reports, etc. so far?

(Part 3 of 3) Business Continuity Planning (BCP) and Disaster Recovery (DR) Planning for Commercial Banks of Nepal: Disaster Recovery, Training, Testing and Update, and Planning for the Pandemic

Disaster Recovery

Disaster recovery is a subset of business continuity efforts and basically deals with technological aspects of the BCPIn accordance with the NRB guidelines, during the Disaster Recovery Planning (DRP), the bank should choose suitable data recovery strategies for different business processes to meet the required RPOs and RTOs as specified in the BIAs of those processes.

The bank must put a management approved DRP in place to prepare for the recovery of critical business functions and continuation of technology infrastructure to achieve the same. Such plan should be able to strictly define the resources, action plan, tasks, procedures and data required to manage the technology recovery effort of the bank.

After you completed the BIA, it is a best practice to document a management-approved formal business continuity strategy in respect of people, premises, technology, information, and relationships. This strategy would be the key to guide the course of actions to be used in the development and implementation of the bank’s BCP.

During this process, the BCP Coordinator and the BCP Executive Team (with assistance from technical experts or advisors) should assign proper roles and responsibilities for various other BCP Functional Teams, such as Executive Management Team, Damage Assessment/Salvage Team, IT/Communications Team, Logistics/Transportation Team, Facilities/Security Team, PR/Communication Team, etc. During the disaster recovery process, BCP Functional Teams or Disaster Recovery (DR) Teams have distinct roles to play including but not limited to the following: 

Table-2: Roles and Responsibilities of BCP Functional Teams

Depending on the scope and goals of the BCP, banks could form other functional teams, such as Finance/Accounting Team, Human Resources Team to support their disaster recovery needs. These BCP Functional Teams, aka DR Teams, will be responsible for both the continuity as well as the recover aspects of the BCP. They are assigned with specific duties to perform in both pre and post disaster context.

Each team’s critical business information including call list, task list, customer list, immediate action plans, response procedures, critical equipment, software, supplies, vendors, vital records, etc. must be documented electronically, stored in the Cloud as well as in hard copy formats. 

Training, Testing and Update

Every bank should ensure that BCM is embedded in its organizational culture; as a result, all relevant personnel and staff are aware of their BCP roles and responsibilities. At the headquarters level, each BCP Functional Team (with the help of BCP Coordinator, BCP Executive Team and technical advisors) will be responsible for developing training and exercise materials for their teams based on the information contained in their BCP including  both ERP and DRP.

It is important that the awareness and training activities are followed by frequent drills (including tabletop exercise and departmental or full scale tests) for each BCP Functional Team or DR Team.

The NRB guidelines require that the BCP should be periodically tested (at least annually) to ensure its effectiveness. The testing should include all aspects and constituents of the bank i.e. people, processes and resources including technology infrastructure. BCP testing should be both planned and unplanned and should be audited by internal audit of the bank.

The guidelines further require that the testing and its outcome should be documented and amendments in BCP be made as suggested by the outcome of the test. In addition to regular testing, it is recommended that the team members and managers receive annual refresher training regarding the emergency alert, emergency response, and notification procedures, etc.  

The alternate site test procedure sits at the heart of the disaster recovery test. It deals with two major aspects; firstly exercising the system recovery procedures and establishing the communication links and secondly testing the recovery of the participating application software.

During the full scale test, the application owners and respective DR Teams are responsible to successfully run their applications at the alternate site. The full scale test provides opportunities to address areas where the exercise was successful, problems were encountered, and improvements were necessary.

The NRB guidelines suggest that the bank should check transaction and data integrity between Datacenter and Disaster Recovery site periodically. It is recommended to make this check as a part of End of Day (EOD) or Beginning of Day (BOD) process.

BCP Coordinator, in coordination with the DR Teams, should be responsible for the regular update of the DRP, especially following the full scale test. Afterwards, all participants should be notified of the changes as well as encouraged to maintain the hard copies of the same. Since the recovery solutions are primarily based on BIAs, the BCP Coordinator must also update the bank’s BIAs, at least annually.

The overarching objectives of a BCP testing and exercise program are to create a learning environment for all the participants and to document changes. Testing and exercising the DRP would verify that the recovery procedures work as intended and that the supporting documentation is current, accurate and relevant. Eventually, the program would help determine the state of readiness of the bank’s BCP.

Planning for the Pandemic

In the age of COVID-19 pandemic, it is highly pertinent for the commercial banks and financial institutions to recognize the fact that there are a few notable differences between the conventional Business Continuity Planning (BCP) process and planning for the challenges posed by the pandemic.

Unlike natural, man-made and technological disasters, the impact of a pandemic is highly difficult to determine because of the scale and duration of the crisis situation. These differences call for the banks and financial institutions to review their existing BCPs and prepare to take appropriate actions to respond to the COVID-19 crisis which has potential to cause major business disruptions; both internal as well as external and at multiple levels.

In a recently published report (Anticipate, prepare and respond to crisis, 2021) on the world day for safety and health at work, the International Labor Organization (ILO) particularly emphasizes that investing in a sound and resilient Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) system can build capacity to face future emergencies while supporting the survival and business continuity of enterprises.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is vital that workplaces adopt adequate policies and develop action plans for the prevention and mitigation of the contagion. These should include emergency response preparedness, as part of their BCP, and be in line with the results of proper risk assessments.      

COVID-19 presents an unusual risk scenario where a conventional BCP measure such as relocating staff to an alternate site may not necessarily mitigate the risk. Pandemic events may extend longer than a typical BCP risk scenario so an effective communication strategy is critically important as the pandemic continues to evolve over time.

In the meantime, banks and financial institutions need to ensure the continuity of their critical services, such as providing continued deposit and lending services, cash management, keeping ATMs and online banking functional, managing financial markets, and maintaining the payment and settlement system, etc.

Other key concerns may include health protection of staff, mitigating panic, strengthening morale, providing current and essential information to staff, and resumption of normal business activities once virus containment measures have been eased.

Banks and financial institutions should, therefore, establish a framework for COVID-19 operational risk-management. This framework should be able to put together a COVID-19 Committee, thereby conducting a thorough risk assessment and devising a pandemic response plan. Such plan, eventually a part of the OSH system, would support the bank’s business continuity in its true sense.