(Part III) (1 of 2) Construction Focus Four: Caught–In or –Between Hazards

What is a caught–in or –between hazard?

When the impact alone creates the injury, the event should be recorded as Struck. When the injury is created more as a result of crushing injuries between objects, the event should be recorded as Caught. Caught- in or -between hazards in construction cause accidents such as cave-ins (trenching), being pulled into or caught in machinery and equipment (this includes strangulation as the result of clothing caught in running machinery and equipment) or being compressed or crushed between rolling, sliding, or shifting objects.

caught in or between

Some of the working conditions that contribute to caught–in or –between hazards include: Machinery that has unguarded moving parts or that is not locked out during maintenance; unprotected excavations and trenches; heavy equipment that tips over, collapsing walls during demolition; and working between moving materials and immovable structures, vehicles, or equipment.

What are the common types of caught–in or –between hazards in construction?

A. Machinery that has unguarded moving parts causing caught-in or -between incidents

If machinery is not properly guarded or de-energized during maintenance or repair, injuries from caught–in or –between hazards may result, ranging from amputations and fractures to death.

When machines or power tools are not properly guarded, workers can get their clothing or parts of their body caught in the machines. If machines are not de-energized (locked out) when they are being repaired, they may cycle or otherwise start up and catch a worker’s body part or clothing and cause injury or death.

Workers can be trapped and crushed under heavy equipment that tips, especially if they are thrown from the equipment.

B. Buried in or by

The major hazard related to Buried in or by is cave-ins of unprotected trenches and excavations. Cave-ins crush or suffocate workers.

In addition, trenches may contain hazardous atmospheres; workers can be drown in water, sewage, or chemicals in the trenches; and if working around underground utilities, workers may also face burns, electrocution or explosions from steam, hot water, gas, or electricity.

Workers who are working underneath large scaffolds may also be buried if the scaffolds collapse. Workers may be buried and crushed by walls that collapse during demolition.

C. Pinned between

You can be pinned

  1. between equipment and a solid object, such as a wall or another piece of equipment
  2. between materials being stacked/stored and a solid object, such as a wall or another piece of equipment
  3. between shoring and construction materials in a trench

These types of hazards can result in multiple broken bones, asphyxiation, or death.

(Part II) (2 of 2) Construction Focus Four: Struck-By Hazards

(Part II) (1 of 2) Construction Focus Four: Struck-By Hazards

(Part I) (1 of 2) Construction Focus Four: Fall Hazards

(Part I) (2 of 2) Construction Focus Four: Fall Hazards

Also Read:

Fire Prevention and Fire Protection – Air Pollution in Kathmandu – Construction PPE – Carbon Monoxide poisoning – Electrical Safety – Fall Protection in General Industry– Fearsome 4 of Construction Safety – Fall Restrain System Vs. Fall Arrest System – Respiratory Protection – Portable Ladder Safety – Confined Space Entry – Initiating First Aid/CPR – Are you too busy… – If you have $86,400 in your account…

About Sustainable Safety Solutions, NEPAL

Environmental / Occupational Health & Safety for Planet, People and Profit.
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2 Responses to (Part III) (1 of 2) Construction Focus Four: Caught–In or –Between Hazards

  1. Pingback: (Part II) (2 of 2) Construction Focus Four: Struck-By Hazards | Sustainable Safety Solutions, NEPAL

  2. Pingback: (Part III) (2 of 2) Construction Focus Four: Caught–In or –Between Hazards | Sustainable Safety Solutions, NEPAL

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